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Accelerated Evolution

HISTORY


amy

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sources, quotes, facts etc. that you think were interesting go here~

someone who lived near atomic bomb tests (Isaac Nelson):

"After 1951 they were going to start the testing in Nevada, and everybody was really excited, and thought maybe we'd get a part to play in it and show our patriotism. We wanted to help out what little we could. My wife and I and a hundred or so residents of Cedar drove out to see the first one. We huddled up, our blankets around us because it was so cold, so early in the morning before daylight, and and we were chattering like chipmunks, so excited! Pretty soon, why, the whole sky just flared up in an orange red flash, and it was so brilliant that you could easily see the trees ten miles across the valley, and if you had a newspaper you could have easily read it, it was so bright. . .

Later on in the day, you'd see these fallout clouds drifting down in Kanarraville, and up through Cedar, and if you'd ever seen one you'd never mistake it because it was definitely different from any rain cloud, kind of a pinkish-tan color strung out all down through the valley there for several miles. They'd float over the city and everyone would go out and ooh and aah just like a bunch of hicks. We was never warned that there was any danger in going out and being under these fallout clouds all the time I lived here. . .

Along about 1955 a cloud came over Cedar, and my wife and I, the kids and the neighbors stood outside looking at it and talking about it. Later on towards evening, my wife, her skin, her hands, arms, neck, face, legs, anything that was exposed just turned a beet red. . .she got a severe headache, and nausea, diarrhea, really miserable. We drove out to the hospital, and the doctor said "Well it looks like sunburn, but then it doesn't." Her headache persisted for several months, and the diarrhea and nausea for a few weeks

Four weeks after that I was sitting in the front room reading the paper and she'd gone into the bathroom to wash her hair. All at once she let out the most ungodly scream, and I run in there and there's about half her hair layin' in the washbasin! You can imagine a woman with beautiful, raven-black hair, so black it would glint green in the sunlight just like a raven's wing. . .she was in a state of panic. . .After that she just kept getting weaker, and listless, and she didn't even have any desire to go out in the garden and work with her flowers. . .Finally the doctors said it looked like a large tumor in her brain, and they operated and removed a tumor about the size of a large orange or softball, but they couldn't get it all out, it was too embedded in her brain tissue. Oleta lived two years or so after that operation. She started going downhill from 1955 and died in 1965 at 41."

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"Florence Sally Horner at the age of 11, stole a 5 cent notebook in Hamden, New Jersey. Frank La Salle, a 50 year old mechanic, caught her stealing, told her that he was an FBI agent, and threatened to send her to "a place for girls like you". Then he abducted the girl and spent 21 months traveling with her over different American states and raping her. [..] La Salle, when arrested claimed that he was Florence's father, however, FBI found that her father had died 7 years previously. Florence Horner died in 1952 in a car accident at the age of 15."

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"Florence Sally Horner at the age of 11, stole a 5 cent notebook in Hamden, New Jersey. Frank La Salle, a 50 year old mechanic, caught her stealing, told her that he was an FBI agent, and threatened to send her to "a place for girls like you". Then he abducted the girl and spent 21 months traveling with her over different American states and raping her. [..] La Salle, when arrested claimed that he was Florence's father, however, FBI found that her father had died 7 years previously. Florence Horner died in 1952 in a car accident at the age of 15."

D: That is so sad.

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"Florence Sally Horner at the age of 11, stole a 5 cent notebook in Hamden, New Jersey. Frank La Salle, a 50 year old mechanic, caught her stealing, told her that he was an FBI agent, and threatened to send her to "a place for girls like you". Then he abducted the girl and spent 21 months traveling with her over different American states and raping her. [..] La Salle, when arrested claimed that he was Florence's father, however, FBI found that her father had died 7 years previously. Florence Horner died in 1952 in a car accident at the age of 15."

That's depressing. Post something happy now.

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"We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried, most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita. Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says, 'Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.' I suppose we all thought that one way or another."

J. Robert Oppenheimer after the Trinity Atomic bomb tests of 1945

Video

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"We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried, most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita. Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says, 'Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.' I suppose we all thought that one way or another."

J. Robert Oppenheimer after the Trinity Atomic bomb tests of 1945

Video

Our PowerPoint presentation in 11th grade history pwned.

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A whisk is a cooking utensil used in food preparation to blend ingredients smooth, or incorporate air into a mixture, in a process known as wikt:whisking or whipping. Most whisks consist of a long narrow handle with a series of wire loops joined at the end. The wires are usually metal, but some have plastic for use with nonstick cookware. Whisks are also made from bamboo. Mr Ridley likes whisks and married one called Linda in 2005.

Whisks are commonly used to whip egg whites into a firm foam to make meringue, or to whip cream into whipped cream. Also it is used as Mr Ridleys love life.

A makeshift whisk may be constructed by taking two forks and placing them together so the tines interlock and make a cage. This is far more effective (at, say, whisking egg whites) than using a single fork. Mr Ridley aint settling for no forks.

Some whisks have different shaped loops. A wider, more tear drop shape, is commonly known as a balloon whisk. A longer, more narrow shape, is often known as a French whisk. A flat whisk, sometimes referred to as a Roux whisk, has the loops arranged in flat successive pattern. A gravy whisk commonly has one main loop with another looped coiled around the main. A twirl whisk has one wire that is in a spiral balloon shape. Mr Ridley likes whisks because they make him feel happy inside.

The ball whisk is purported to allow more aeration of the mixture. Instead of loops, a grouping of individual wires come out of the handle and each end with a metal ball. Since there are no crossing wires, the ball whisk is much easier to clean than most other variants; and it is easier to reach into the corners of a pan than with a conventional balloon whisk. Once, Mr Ridleys whisk went missing at school and he started to cry but it turned out that it was under his desk and then he said "YAY!"

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A whisk is a cooking utensil used in food preparation to blend ingredients smooth, or incorporate air into a mixture, in a process known as wikt:whisking or whipping. Most whisks consist of a long narrow handle with a series of wire loops joined at the end. The wires are usually metal, but some have plastic for use with nonstick cookware. Whisks are also made from bamboo. Mr Ridley likes whisks and married one called Linda in 2005.

Whisks are commonly used to whip egg whites into a firm foam to make meringue, or to whip cream into whipped cream. Also it is used as Mr Ridleys love life.

A makeshift whisk may be constructed by taking two forks and placing them together so the tines interlock and make a cage. This is far more effective (at, say, whisking egg whites) than using a single fork. Mr Ridley aint settling for no forks.

Some whisks have different shaped loops. A wider, more tear drop shape, is commonly known as a balloon whisk. A longer, more narrow shape, is often known as a French whisk. A flat whisk, sometimes referred to as a Roux whisk, has the loops arranged in flat successive pattern. A gravy whisk commonly has one main loop with another looped coiled around the main. A twirl whisk has one wire that is in a spiral balloon shape. Mr Ridley likes whisks because they make him feel happy inside.

The ball whisk is purported to allow more aeration of the mixture. Instead of loops, a grouping of individual wires come out of the handle and each end with a metal ball. Since there are no crossing wires, the ball whisk is much easier to clean than most other variants; and it is easier to reach into the corners of a pan than with a conventional balloon whisk. Once, Mr Ridleys whisk went missing at school and he started to cry but it turned out that it was under his desk and then he said "YAY!"

Thats not history at all.

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I'm a huge history buff. I spend most of my free time going over history books, and am currently taking on the slightly more than arduous task of reading Clausewitz.

The Fourth Crusade, for those of you not familiar with it, is easily one of the most ridiculous and awesome debaucheries in history. Called upon by the pope to wage a holy war in the Middle East to reclaim Jerusalem in the name of Christendom, the bravest men of Genoa and modern day France set out on a quest that ultimately resulted in the absolute ruin of the greatest city in the Christian empire, as holy knights raped prostitutes and virgins alike on the alter of the most holy temple in Constantinople. Gotta love irony. :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_crusade

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I'm a huge history buff. I spend most of my free time going over history books, and am currently taking on the slightly more than arduous task of reading Clausewitz.

The Fourth Crusade, for those of you not familiar with it, is easily one of the most ridiculous and awesome debaucheries in history. Called upon by the pope to wage a holy war in the Middle East to reclaim Jerusalem in the name of Christendom, the bravest men of Genoa and modern day France set out on a quest that ultimately resulted in the absolute ruin of the greatest city in the Christian empire, as holy knights raped prostitutes and virgins alike on the alter of the most holy temple in Constantinople. Gotta love irony. :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_crusade

pfft I'll need you for my nation final man.

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Just like Shad before me, I too am a history buff and nut with heavy emphasis on military history. I would say I also minor in the more personal histories of the darker side of humanity, i.e.: serial killers and mass murderers throughout history.

One piece of history I found interesting when I first read about it was the misconception that during the American Civil War the Union Army always wore blue uniforms and the Confederate Army wore gray. In fact, at the very first major battle of the war --- Battle at Bull Run (Battle at Manassas) --- both armies had regiments that wore blue and gray uniforms. The Confederate Army wore blue just for the fact that they hadn't been able to manufacture enough official gray uniforms to outfit all their regiments and ended up having to send some of them to fight wearing Union blue uniforms captured when the Southern States seceded. The Union army primarily wore their regulation blue uniforms, but some newly created states regiments ended up wearing gray uniforms (and other colors some as bright as red with yellow trims) just because they wanted to stand out from the pack.

Needless to say, the First Battle of Bull Run wasn't the highlight of military tactics and manuevering as both sides mistook friend for foe and vice versa. The Union Army's advantage in the beginning was partly due to their commanders knowing the terrain and to larger numbers. This advantage became a moot point once a certain schoolmaster turned regimental commander from the Virginia Military Institute took his command and became a stone wall in front of the Union advance. This act stemmed the tide of the Confederate retreat and rallied the units into counterattacking an advancing but off-balanced Union army which thought they were meeting up with other Union troops. Instead they ran into rallied Confederate troops that had been given Union blues due to shortages of Confederate grays.

Who would've thought that a piece of garment would have such an impact on what would turn out to be one of the most monumental points in American history.

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