Jump to content
Accelerated Evolution

Conflict in the Middle East


Recommended Posts

Lebanon attacks Israel & Israel attacks Lebanon

SOURCE: http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/07/13/mideast/index.html

Israel attacks Beirut airport after rockets hit Haifa

Thursday, July 13, 2006; Posted: 5:51 p.m. EDT (21:51 GMT)

JERUSALEM (CNN) -- Israeli forces struck Beirut's international airport for the second time Thursday, hitting fuel tanks that exploded into fireballs.

The attack came soon after two rockets struck the northern Israeli port of Haifa on a day of spiraling violence and deepening crisis.

Israel Defense Forces said the Haifa rockets came from Lebanon and blamed Hezbollah, whose guerrillas abducted two soldiers and killed eight others one day ealier.

The violent aftermath has claimed the lives of 45 Lebanese civilians and two soldiers, according to the Lebanese health ministry. (Watch as fighting along the border intensifies -- 1:45)

Subsequent Hezbollah rocket attacks have killed at least two Israelis and wounded 50, according to Israeli ambulance services and police.

Daniel Ayalon, the Israeli ambassador to the United States, said the Haifa attack was "a major, major escalation." ( Watch the strike on Beirut's airport -- :44)

"It goes to show that there is no timetable," Ayalon said during a speech in Washington. "We will have to continue with the operation until there is no capability of the Hezbollah to do what they are doing."

Hezbollah, meanwhile, says it has a right to remain on "any part of Lebanese soil."

"We intend to send a clear message that we wish not to escalate this conflict by killing civilians," said Naim Qasem, Hezbollah's deputy secretary-general. "But we know that Israel will not stop its aggression until it feels pain. Therefore, they should learn from what happened today. They have failed to protect their cities and their civilians."

Hezbollah earlier had threatened to hit Haifa, but Lebanese TV reported that the militant group denied launching the attack on the city of 280,000.

Ambulance services said no one was hurt in the attack, which -- if confirmed -- would be the first time Hezbollah rockets have hit so deeply into Israeli territory.

Earlier Thursday, Israel's warplanes bombed Beirut's international airport for the first time and its navy began a blockade of Lebanon's ports.

Hundreds of targets between the southern border and the capital were attacked, the IDF said.

Hezbollah guerrillas fired scores of rockets from Lebanon into northern Israel in the most intense bombardment in years.

Lebanon also said 103 people were hurt by the Israeli attacks, The Associated Press reported.

One rocket attack Thursday on the northern Israeli town of Nahariya hit a group of journalists, the AP said.

Both Israel and Lebanon have said the violence amounts to acts of war.

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert called the attacks and abductions an "act of war" and blamed the Lebanese government, which he said would be held responsible for the two soldiers' safe release.

Lebanese Interior Minister Ahmed Fatfat called Israel's retaliatory attack on Beirut airport a "general act of war," saying the strikes had nothing to do with Hezbollah but were instead an attack against the country's "economic interests," especially its tourism industry.

Beirut's Rafik Hariri International Airport was forced to close after Israeli fighter jets hit all three of its runways, leaving huge craters that made them unusable. All flights have been diverted. (Airport map)

Two other Lebanese airports were attacked Thursday morning, the IDF said.

The Israeli military gave no details, but Lebanese army sources said that the Rayak Air Base in the Bekaa Valley near the Syrian border had been hit as well as a small military airport in Qulayaat in northern Lebanon. (Watch how Israel targeted the Beirut airport -- :46)

Israel said it targeted the international airport because it was a transfer point for weapons and supplies to Hezbollah.

Israeli warships set up a blockade, preventing cruise ships from docking in the Lebanese capital and cutting off the delivery of fuel to operate Lebanese power plants.

The roar of Israeli warplanes could be heard over the main transportation route between Lebanon and Syria, and witnesses said hundreds of tourists were lined up on the Syrian border, trying to get out of Lebanon.

Lebanese Information Minister Ghazi Aridi called for a comprehensive cease-fire, saying the Lebanese government had nothing to do with the Hezbollah attacks.

An adviser to Lebanese Prime Minister Fuad Sinora, Mohamad Chatah, said the country's fledgling government has struggled to assert its authority since Syria withdrew its troops last year.

"No question that we are against this kind of violence," Chatah said. But he added, "Many people in Lebanon have very strong views against what Israel has been doing."

After Israel's airport strike, planes began dropping leaflets warning residents of an impending attack on an area of southern Beirut where Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah is believed to live. (Watch initial reports on the runway bombings -- 6:00)

Israel: 'We mean business'

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said Thursday he fears a "regional war is mounting" with Israel's military campaigns in Lebanon and Gaza, where forces were deployed after last month's capture of an Israeli soldier.

"This is not our interest and will not bring peace and stability to the region," Abbas said, referring to "this [israeli] aggression."

President Bush said all countries had a right to defend themselves but warned Israel to take care not to "weaken" Lebanon's government. (Full story)

Bush also stressed during a visit to Germany that Syria "needs to be held to account."

Hezbollah enjoys substantial backing from Syria and Iran and is considered a terrorist organization by the United States and Israel. The group holds posts in Lebanon's government.

Israeli Security Cabinet Minister Isaac Herzog said: "We are taking strong measures so that it will be clear to the Lebanese people and government ... that we mean business."

The United Nations will send a team to the Middle East to urge both sides to use restraint, a spokesman for Secretary-General Kofi Annan said Thursday. (Full story)

The Security Council will hold an "urgent meeting" Friday at the request of Lebanon to address the escalating tensions, France's U.N. ambassador Jean-Marc de La Sabliere said Thursday.

Captives named

Israeli airstrikes were aimed at targets used by Hezbollah for storing weapons, the IDF said.

Warplanes also hit the al-Manar television station, because Hezbollah uses it to incite and recruit activists, the IDF said. A broadcast tower was destroyed and three people were injured, but the station was able to continue broadcasting, al-Manar Editor Ibrahim Moussawi said.

Israel's Cabinet authorized a "severe and harsh" response to the abduction of two soldiers, identified Thursday as Ehud Goldvasser, 31, from Nahariya, and Eldad Regev, 26, from the Haifa suburb of Kiryat Motzkin.

Hezbollah called for a prisoner exchange, but Israel has rejected the call.

Hezbollah chief Nasrallah told reporters that seizing the soldiers was "our natural, only and logical right" to win freedom for Hezbollah prisoners held by Israel.

Nasrallah said the two soldiers had been taken to a place "far, far away" and that an Israeli military campaign would not win their release.

CNN's Barbara Starr and John Vause and journalist Anthony Mills in Beirut contributed to this report.

Copyright 2006 CNN. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Associated Press contributed to this report.

Things are looking bright if you want a new world war. After Sharon's stroke I expected shit to hit the fan in the Middle East and it looks they just about have. Not that the situation was fine and dandy before, it was anything but, however now we're bordering on an actual war between Israel and another state. Given Israel's past I expect nothing but victory for them, but this sort of conflict could only lead to Iran finally becoming the "U.S." of the Middle East that they've been trying to become for nearly 30 years.

MOD EDIT: Changed title of thread so it'd be all for Middle East Conflict. Hope you don't mind.

No, not at all. This is probably a better idea in the long run, unfortunately.

Link to comment
  • Replies 57
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

"We intend to send a clear message that we wish not to escalate this conflict by killing civilians," said Naim Qasem, Hezbollah's deputy secretary-general. "But we know that Israel will not stop its aggression until it feels pain. Therefore, they should learn from what happened today. They have failed to protect their cities and their civilians."

LOL, because we know that is how it works. As is almost always the case, whenever one side attacks the other will retaliate, then the other retaliates and this continues… and so the never-ending cycle continues…

Link to comment

Saudi Arabia indicated on Thursday that Hizbullah bore the responsibility for the current crisis in Lebanon, Israel Radio reported.

In an official statement, the Saudi government said that a distinction must be drawn between “legitimate resistance” and “adventurous, irresponsible acts” committed by groups in Lebanon who don’t recognize the government and don’t coordinate with other Arab nations.

The statement said that these groups must take responsibility and solve the crisis themselves.

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid...icle%2FShowFull

Officials in the Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem, where an Arabic language internet website is being operated, were surprised to read comments by two surfers calling on Israel to use tough military action against Hizbullah and Hamas.

“If Israel doesn’t take very very tough offensive actions against this terror, it will open the doors of hell on herself,” a reader wrote.

“Arabs understand only the language of force. If they feel Israel is weak they will carry on until it is completely destroyed. That’s how they think. What is stopping them is your force and if this thinking evaporates, even if only in their minds, Israel would heavy prices in civilians and casualties. Israel has to be strong until peace is achieved with these terrorists,” an anonymous Arab reader wrote.

A British surfer who called himself Said chose to turn directly to Prime Minister Ehud Olmert: “Mr. Olmert, I do not support wars and I am never happy to see Israel losing soldiers and this in order to protect the unsolved of Arabs. But, I believe the State of Israel faces an excellent opportunity to assassinate the extreme Hamas and Hizbullah leadership, which are linked to Syria and Iran who are isolated by the international community.”

“Both these groups, who represent an Islamic and reactionary ideology, work together, each with its futuristic views, and also with the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, in order to disperse their backward ideas among Arab citizens. They are spreading a culture of hate among the young, which sent the Middle East 200 years back,” he wrote.

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/1,7340,L-3275291,00.html

Now we need more flying pig moments and there will be total peace in the middle east.

1/Hamas recognises Israel, supports 2 state solution and disarms factions

2/Iran elects moderate president, cuts off support of Hezbollah, ends nuclear programs

3/Syria's Assad withdraws from Lebanon.

Flying%20Pig.jpg

The pigs flying, but how long will it last?

Link to comment

I was in Canada on a trip when this happened, so my news wasn't that good, but one of the trip leades is still considering going to Israel in the midst of all of this. Her reasoning is basically that its Israel, wars happen. This is only big news once it escalates, till then, its another squabble

Link to comment

If it somehow does turn out to be WW3 though, and the draft is reinstated, we should totally have an AE meetup in Canada. Because just about everyone here will be going there. I know I will.

We won't be protected there any longer. Damned traitorous Canadians!

Oh mah darlin' oh mah darlin' oh MAH DARLIN' CLEMINTIIINE!

Link to comment

Ok here's my honest opinion of the Hezballah-Israel thing:

First of all, Israel should scare all of you. Without any sort of diplomacy, they attack Lebanon. In my opinion, war should not even BEGIN to be considered until diplomacy begins failing. Now they might just be mimicing Bush's pre-emptive strike BS, but if that's the case, I feel they also have an obligation to rebuild Lebanon, as we have an obligation to rebuild Iraq.

Essentially, Israel is screwing Lebanon's economy and plowing salt into their dirt to boot. This is evident by attacking airports, port areas, powerplants, schools, hospitals, etc, etc.

Now who really thinks Israel plans to rebuild anything at all?

Hahahahaha........

Link to comment

Man, sure is hard to tell which side of the debate you're on, isn't it? >_>

Now, consider this: Hezbollah has always been a dangerous thorn in Israel's side, and Lebanon's government has always been so weak as to cower under their might. Heck, they have the same situation as Palestine- the terrorist's armed forces don't even listen to their representatives in their government. It's even worse when you consider the fact that Lebanon's military, all seventy-thousand men (and women?), are noticeably weaker than Hezbollah as a whole.

Lebanon as a government? Complete non-entity. Barely sufficient to keep the peace amongst its own citizens on a normal day. When you add in Hezbollah aggression, Israel can only assume that there's not a snowball's chance in hell that Lebanon'll do anything about it. Not that they wouldn't want to- simpy because they can't. The only militarily logical way to proceed is then to define Hezbollah as the acting force in the region.

And yes- I deliberately chose the words "militarily logical." >_> Blasting Lebanon to smithereens is the quickest way to temporarily solve the problem... but to permanently solve it requires severing the Syria-Iran connection. Unfortunately, it then becomes a matter of priorities- and protecting the Israeli citizenry is first and foremost on the mind of the Israeli army. Above even the dire need for aggressive diplomacy.

Link to comment

Man, sure is hard to tell which side of the debate you're on, isn't it? >_>

Now, consider this: Hezbollah has always been a dangerous thorn in Israel's side, and Lebanon's government has always been so weak as to cower under their might. Heck, they have the same situation as Palestine- the terrorist's armed forces don't even listen to their representatives in their government. It's even worse when you consider the fact that Lebanon's military, all seventy-thousand men (and women?), are noticeably weaker than Hezbollah as a whole.

Ok, first of all, the side of the debate I am on is neither for Hezbollah or Israel. I'm not even for Israel.

The side of the debate I am on is peace, diplomacy, democracy, rational thinking, justice, and the growth of trust between the diverse nations and peoples of a hot area in the world.

If it wasn't for Hezbollah, there wouldn't be a Lebanese government to cower under their might. It was Hezbollah that organized a militia to boot Israel out of Lebanese occupation in the first place.

Lebanon as a government? Complete non-entity. Barely sufficient to keep the peace amongst its own citizens on a normal day.

Um, source? I don't remember hearing about mobs storming Lebanese streets. Kicking Syria out is another matter. I think every single Lebanese saw that as positive change. But what do you mean the Lebanese govenment couldn't keep the peace?

When you add in Hezbollah aggression, Israel can only assume that there's not a snowball's chance in hell that Lebanon'll do anything about it. Not that they wouldn't want to- simpy because they can't. The only militarily logical way to proceed is then to define Hezbollah as the acting force in the region.

Hezbollah aggression??????? That was funny stuff man. They kidnapped 2 Israeli soldiers with the intentions of a prisioner swap. Crude? Yeah. But hey- diplomacy failed. Aggression? No. Israel is the aggressor. And yeah I agree, no one is expecting Lebanon to do jackshit. Fact is, in the past, Israel had actually participated in a few prisoner swaps and even a small, isolated strike to save Israeli prisoners in another country. This was unprecidented and a very unfair display of force.

And yes- I deliberately chose the words "militarily logical." >_> Blasting Lebanon to smithereens is the quickest way to temporarily solve the problem... but to permanently solve it requires severing the Syria-Iran connection. Unfortunately, it then becomes a matter of priorities- and protecting the Israeli citizenry is first and foremost on the mind of the Israeli army. Above even the dire need for aggressive diplomacy.

How does blasting Lebanon to smithereens solve anything though? Hezbollah was the only military force capable of successfully defeating Israeli troops. Israel fought... what... 6 other Arab nations and won? You really think this is going to be over soon? You really think this is a temporary solution to anything? Really, this is just the beginning. And blasting the fuck out of a nation solves nothing. Take for example... oh... Afghanistan.

Protecting the Israeli citizenry? Name one Israeli citizen that was in jeopardy before they attacked Lebanon. ZERO. Two SOLDIERS were captive. Ok. Name how many Israeli citizens are in jeopardy now. I don't know how many Israeli casualties there have been so far. Too many. Every single one could have been avoided. Hezbollah doesn't want this war. Israel does.

Link to comment

Again, the choice of words was careful: I stated that the Lebanese government was barely sufficient for everyday purposes. Their economic status, as shown in Wikipedia and recent news publications from the Mercury News and others, has only started climbing out of a nearly two-decade long depression in recent years- very recent, in fact, as they were definitely still in bad shape back in, say, 2002. Most of this recovery, however, has been redirected back into the market to stimulate further growth- their army, as stated, remains at a lower operational level than that of Hezbollah.

Now, I reiterate the Hezbollah comparison because of this: though the Hezbollah movement was initially well-intentioned, it doesn't change the fact that they are, in fact and action, a terrorist organization not so much aimed at the safeguarding of the Lebanese sovereignty, but the total and absolute destruction of Israel. They didn't stop at securing Lebanon's borders! The Lebanese government would like very much for peace to reign- peace brings tourism brings plenty of cash- but cannot possibly hope to succeed at this as long as they have a movement within their borders that can, will and have defied the government's will in pursuit of their own agenda.

Let's also not forget why the Israeli forces occupied Lebanon in the first place- even back then, they were an international non-entity, serving unwillingly as the staging point for both Syrian and Palestinian troops before Israel's second occupation. In fact, while Israel had unilaterally pulled its troops out of Lebanon back in 2000, it wasn't until 2005 that Syria, the primary backer of the Hezbollah movement, was kicked out during the Cedar Revolution. Then there were those string of assassinations that struck major Lebanese figures right before... the government can't even protect its own.

Which brings us to the current situation. Regardless of their intent in kidnapping the two soldiers, Hezbollah made a very obvious and stupid error in their timing. Given the conflict with the Palestinians, and Hezbollah's military dominance of the region, Israel's assertion that the kidnappings were a declaration of war does make sense. If somebody's attacking your flank whilst you're otherwise engaged, assuming the worst is the best and most feasible option you have... and given Israel's history, I wouldn't put it past their military minds to assume that it was the only option they had.

This assumption may have strong basis even without the paranoia attached. As you mentioned, Israel's proved its worth in conventional warfare, pushing off the efforts of six nations to eradicate it. But as it's gotten more competent, so has its enemies- and against a massive guerilla force, they're especially in trouble. True, as of yet only a few Israelis have suffered from Hezbollah's current actions- according to wikipedia, 32 dead and 400+ wounded from the initial and indiscriminate missile volleys- but do you really expect Israel's government to gamble the safety of their citizens on the hopes that Hezbollah will prove to be equally incompetent during a near-future attack?

Terrorist organizations with long-range military capabilities are astoundingly frightening things, Cappy. If the Israelis panicked, who can blame them? And if they didn't panic, who can still blame them? This isn't fighting another army of convential infantry, tanks and planes- this is fighting an army of high-tech assassins. A body political without the need of a head- only sustenance in the form of Syrian and Iranian funding. The only way to counter such a thing is to either starve it- or to make sure it can't hide anywhere near you. And given that Hezbollah's proven willing to strike even while Israel's military is on full alert, starving it is probably not the most optimal option.

Though the most immediate victims are the Lebanese citizenry, that itself doesn't cover the fact that, without a stable base of operations, Hezbollah simply can't do anything more for the moment. Not against Israel itself, at any rate. They can hide further up north, but except for missile attacks- which, by the way, alone can justify an Israeli excursion, given that they're all located within southern Lebanon- they certainly can't fulfill their primary agenda.

As for the Afghanistan comparison? The brutality of the Afghanistan attack was a necessity- it was all, after all, controlled by the Taliban regime- which I highly doubt you'll find anybody that'd argue against the removal of. Especially since, unlike with Iraq, we had a solid and irrefutable case against them. Afghanistan was on everybody's hit list, not just the Neocons, and the only way to keep the Taliban out- at least for the first few years- was to make sure they had nothing to hold onto afterwards. Regime change is a nasty, nasty business.

Oh yes. And unlike Lebanon, Afghanistan's military actually does actively work against terrorism, has a growing educational foundation (they're about to open their first co-ed university since... what, ever?), and happens to have a working democratic government. Not bad for a country with the world's worst landmine problem and a crippled infrastructure.

Link to comment

Europe Meets Israel

Jeffrey Gedmin Mon Jul 24, 9:46 PM ET

Washington (The Weekly Standard) Vol. 011, Issue 43 - 7/31/2006 - Tel AvivA week ago I arrived here, and already the atmosphere was a bit surreal. I would sit outside in a beachfront restaurant, enjoying a warm summer breeze, music, and delicious grilled fish, as scores of young people walked the boardwalk. You felt that this half of the country at least was at peace. Tel Aviv's large white-sand beach was packed by day. But in the evening it was hard not to notice the military planes that passed overhead every few minutes on their way north.

Israel was surely at war.

I'm here cohosting a group of European journalists, writers, and broadcasters from a half dozen different countries, all of whom are visiting Israel for the first time. Conventional wisdom early in our trip was that certain places in the north would be exempt from the violence. We had planned a trip to Tiberias, with a dinner on the Sea of Galilee. That was until we heard from Yaara, the manager of the Decks restaurant, who told us a rocket had hit nearby. Windows were damaged, she said, but "God would protect us" if we still wanted to come.

Self-preservation concentrates the mind and turns you into a defense geek. The Katyusha has a range of 12 to 15 miles. The Fajr-3 and the Fajr-5 can sail approximately 25 and 45 miles, respectively. When we arrived, my sources told me that Hezbollah might have a number of long-range Iranian missiles capable of reaching Tel Aviv. Within 48 hours, Israel had destroyed an Iranian Zelzal rocket with a range of up to 200 km. That would have brought Tel Aviv into range. Since then the Israelis have destroyed another 19.

I cannot say I have felt entirely safe in Jerusalem. The Israelis caught a suicide bomber near the Jaffe Gate just before we arrived. There has been much talk about the other side opening a third front. With rockets streaming in from Gaza and Lebanon, there has been little reason to believe

West Bank terrorists would stay out of the game. A day after we left Tel Aviv, another suicide bomber was nabbed north of the city. As I write, yet another suicide bomber is said to be on the loose in the same area. For our tour through the old city, we hired two security men to accompany our group.

In Jerusalem, the King David Hotel has become, once again, a center of backroom kibitzing in a time of crisis. New York Times columnist Tom Friedman passes one way through the lobby; Israeli politician and former Soviet dissident Natan Sharansky, the other. E.U. foreign policy chief Javier Solana strolls down an adjacent hallway with former Mossad head Efraim Halevy. You have to wonder whether Halevy, a former ambassador to the E.U., can make any headway. In his recently published memoir, Man in the Shadows, Halevy says if you take European arguments to their logical conclusions, "then only the disappearance of the State of Israel would succeed in pacifying the insatiable desires of the Arab world." This may sound a touch extreme, but Solana lives up to the caricature. When asked by a television reporter whether the axis of Iran, Syria, and Hezbollah has been behind the current conflict, Solana replies by saying that he does "not want to mention names." In another interview, Solana is pushed in vain to admit that Hezbollah belongs on the E.U.'s terrorist list.

I think Gideon Samet, the prominent liberal-left columnist for Haaretz, shocked our group a little. Samet is not exactly a hard-liner. He has a healthy European-style dislike of the American president. He has argued for dialogue with Hamas. Now he tells these nice European journalists that the current Israeli operations in Lebanon constitute a "just war." This is difficult for the group to swallow. The European narrative seems to go like this: Hezbollah kidnaps two Israeli soldiers; Israel seeks revenge by bombing the hell out of Lebanon. There's nothing more to say.

As a result of this blinkered view, much of the media coverage has been deplorable. A doctor treating children at a hospital in the northern city of Safed could barely control his frustration. His hospital, which serves Jews, Muslims, Christians, and Bedouins, was hit by a Hezbollah rocket last week, and this "soften spoken gentleman," as one of my European colleagues put it, wants to know why the BBC is obsessed with legitimate Israeli action against Hezbollah. Europe's pols seem to be reading from the same script as its media. Spanish prime minister José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero has lambasted Israel for using "abusive force that does not allow innocent human beings to defend themselves." After a public appearance in Spain last week, someone placed a Palestinian scarf around Zapatero's neck. The prime minister allowed himself to be photographed in it.

There can be no doubt that Hamas set the stage for all this. Israel withdrew from Gaza, and the Palestinians celebrated their independence in the ensuing months by sending some 600 rockets into Israel. Hamas then raised the ante by kidnapping an Israeli soldier. As a somewhat liberal writer friend here puts it, "If you keep poking a lion, sooner or later you're going to get swatted with a big paw." As for Hezbollah, before nabbing those two other Israeli soldiers, it had already begun firing its own rockets into Israel from southern Lebanon, a detail many European commentators overlook. What's more, the attacks began coincidentally at a moment when Iran was failing to respond to the rather magnanimous U.S.-E.U. proposal on Tehran's nuclear file. Dennis Ross,

Bill Clinton's former envoy, sees a clear line to Iran.

President Bush rightly names Syria, too. The E.U.'s Solana, however, is loath to mention names.

Israel and Europe can trade together wonderfully, but the dialogue about security is nearly hopeless. Israel wants to smash Hezbollah, a state within a state and a wholly owned Iranian subsidiary. Countries like Egypt, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia, all aware of Iran's regional ambitions, don't seem to mind. Lebanon would surely be better off if the Israelis succeeded. But Europe wants an end to the conflict as soon as possible, regardless of the consequences. Some actually believe that a prisoner exchange--that was initially the Hamas and Hezbollah proposal--would end the "cycle of violence."

The Israelis, goes the line, destroy families, imprison youths, and even hold young women in detention!

According to a recent study by Shabak, the Israeli

FBI, Palestinians are responsible for 24,000 assaults on Israeli civilians since September 2000. One hundred and forty three suicide bombers, the majority between 17 and 24 years old, have killed 513 Israelis. As for Palestinian women under Israeli lock and key, I like the story of Achlam Tmimi. In her early twenties, she is serving 16 consecutive life sentences for helping a suicide bomber blow up a pizzeria, killing 16. She says she would do it again. I am also fond of the story of another infamous young woman who had made a date with an Israeli teenager on the Internet. Two days later his body was found riddled with bullets. Five years later, the young woman, Amneh Muna, is a hero for many in the West Bank. Poverty and despair account for all this? I guess I am skeptical. I am not entirely convinced that putting these folks back on the streets is really the best way to lasting peace and reconciliation.

Jeffery Gedmin is director of the Aspen Institute Berlin and a member of the advisory board of Knowing Israel, a study tour program for journalists.

Link to comment

This is just a cycle of violence that won't be ending anytime soon. Both sides are stubborn and are heading for last resort. Now Israel could've taken the high road and initiated action to respond to the kidnapping in a less extreme way. But no, just bomb Lebanon to bits, who cares about the innocent! Off with their heads!

Link to comment

This is just a cycle of violence that won't be ending anytime soon. Both sides are stubborn and are heading for last resort. Now Israel could've taken the high road and initiated action to respond to the kidnapping in a less extreme way. But no, just bomb Lebanon to bits, who cares about the innocent! Off with their heads!

There is no high road in warfare. Only varying body counts.

Link to comment

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...